Sloan’s “Unkind” So Kind On The Ears

Ha! I’m in love with this instantly. I guess most of us have been in a relationship like this at some point. A word of kind advice to the songwriter: RUN! GET AWAY! FLEE! It’s never going to work out. BUT! You got one KILLER power pop song out of the deal. Cut your losses and break up. OMG am I running an advice column now? Musically rooted in The Cars, Radiohead, Stones, Clash and so many other wonderful references, Sloan has a hot single here, perfectly produced and oh so pop. The second verse cracked me the fuck up.

Sloan
“Unkind” (download mp3)
from “The Double Cross”
(Outside Music)
“Unkind” (play)
More, please!

Matt Murphy’s Not “Just A Show”

This is a classic tale of life on the rock n’ roll road told from the point of view of Guy Terrifico. Guy may be the fictional subject of a Canadian mockumentary titled The Life And Hard Times Of Guy Terrifico, but this song is really good!

Matt Murphy
“Just A Show” (download mp3)
from “The Life And Hard Times Of Guy Terrifico: Bring It Back Home”
(Outside Music)
“Just A Show” (play)

I WANT MORE!

Black Mountain – “Old Fangs” (mp3)

Black Mountain – “Old Fangs” (play)

Black Mountain collides hi-octane Hammond Organ with 70’s analog synth sounds and massive guitars to create a thing we will call: rock music. This is gr8 stuff they wrote and recorded Independently, and it is a fine alternative to all the poo the major labels now find themselves increasingly unable to foist upon a disinterested public. I present to you “Old Fangs” — a kick ass single from a Rock Band from Vancouver, featuring male and female vocals that fit together seamlessly over a monster track.

Black Mountain
“Old Fangs” (mp3)
from “Wilderness Heart”
(Outside Music)
Need more!

Black Mountain takes a bite of the Rock w/ “Old Fangs”

Black Mountain – “Old Fangs” mp3

Black Mountain collides hi-octane Hammond Organ with 70’s analog synth sounds and massive guitars to create a thing we will call Rock Music. But genres are a funny thing. Often when I post here, I learn something new about how limited genre descriptions really are. And they change, you know? Indie Rock once meant Rock on an Independent Label, created DIY in someone’s Sweaty Basement. Alternative Rock, probably the most annoying genre classification of all time, meant Rock that was Alternative to.. what, exactly? The “Alternative” 90’s produced some truly dreadful music, in the wake of Nirvana’s wonderfulness. It was a merciless irony, and they had the sack to call that warmed-over grunge-bandwagon expired-milk doom-whining in endless rotation paid for by giant corporations, “ALTERNATIVE!” Kafka couldn’t do better.  Where was I? Oh yeah. Black Mountain plays Rock Music. This is gr8 stuff they wrote and recorded Independently, and it is a fine Alternative to all the Poo the Major Labels now find themselves increasingly unable to foist upon a disinterested public. I present to you “Old Fangs” – a kick ass single from a Rock Band from Vancouver, featuring male and female vocals that fit together seamlessly over a monster track. Genres and labels be damned. This is Good.

Black Mountain
“Old Fangs” (mp3)
from “Wilderness Heart”
(Outside Music)
Need more!

Tinariwen – from underground cassettes to the world

Tinariwen – “Imidiwan Afrik Temdam”

Music is the universal language. And sometimes you hear something universal that you don’t readily understand. For me, hearing this mp3 from Tinariwen for the first time a week ago was such a moment. The mood of the song is so soothing and reassuring, life affirming and wise, it grew on me slowly and before I knew it was in love. The singing and guitar playing is such magnificent ear candy, I can’t stop playing the album over and over now. For a glimpse into the story behind this band, here’s a quote from their most unusual bio –

During the early 1980s, in a rebel camp run by Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi, a band was formed by musicians from the Touareg (Saharan nomads from Mali) tribe. They called themselves Tinariwen, which means “empty spaces” in their native Tamashek. Their music incorporated hypnotic, rocked-out, bluesy-sounding electric guitars (a first for people from an area where power is only sporadically available) while retaining traditional instruments, rhythms and call-and-response vocals. For nearly two decades, Tinariwen’s underground cassettes counseled anti-violence and ethnic pride amid encroaching chaos, making them a beacon of empowerment for local youth struggling with the demise of “camel culture” and conflicting propaganda. A performance at The Festival in the Desert, the worldwide release of The Radio Tisdas Sessions (2001)) and Amassakoul (“Traveler” – 2004), and an international tour brought their ancient-modern Tishoumaren (“guitar”) sound to new audiences, catapulting these indigo-clad tribes-men-and-women to universal fame. It also gained them admiration from pop stars like Robert Plant and Carlos Santana. Their third CD, produced by British bluesman and World Village label-mate Justin Adams, was recorded at Bogolan studios in Bamako, Mali. The fifteen tracks celebrate their heritage in all its trance-inducing, hip-shaking, majesty, mystery, and magic.

Tinariwen
“Imidiwan Afrik Temdam” (mp3)
from “Imidiwan : Companions”
(Outside Music)

Need more!