Blind Blake & Charlie Spand – “Hastings Street” mp3

Blind Blake, Charlie Spand – “Hastings Street” mp3

When the legendary Blind Blake and Charlie Spand teamed up for this exquisite recording in the 1920s, they could scarcely have guessed that their contribution would be enjoyed for almost 80 years, and how would you explain their song being ripped to mp3 and played through and I-Pod. Here is one helluva track for your enjoyment, from two masters of ragtime and blues whose influence continues to grow in the new millennium.

Smith & Irvine – “Lonesome Road Blues” mp3

Man, this is some roadhouse bustin’ piana ticklin’ fiddle faddlin’ saloon gristle. Every riff in this nugget has been been refried, and served up a zillion times. But imagine, as you listen, how it sounded when this was first made. Cliches only become cliches after people repeat them over and again. This would have blown the roof off any public watering hole, for sure, in its day, and that’s why it sounds so darn familiar in these modern times.

Smith & Irvine – “Lonesome Road Blues” mp3

Lonnie Johnson – “Drifting Along Blues”http://www.publicdomain2ten.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=1057 mp3

A surprisingly clean copy of a good ole side o’ vinyl by Lonnie Johnson.¬† Sincere and true lyrics are universal in their appeal, and a magnificent performance of vocal and piano accompaniment is something to treasure in this time of canned music.

Lonnie Johnson – “Drifting Along Blues” mp3

Bessie Jackson (Lucille Bogan) – “Sweet Petunia” mp3

Bessie Jackson was a pseudonym for Lucille Bogan, a classic female blues artist from the ’20s and ’30s. This 1927 recording made her famous and raised a few eyebrows amongst her listening audience. Lyrical content was not as ‘randy’ as it is today and songs like this were considered to be lyrically perverse. Judge for yourself…

Bessie Jackson (Lucille Bogan) – “Sweet Petunia” mp3

Frank Melrose – “Pass The Jug” mp3

At age sixteen Frank Melrose left home and eventually settled in St. Louis and then Kansas City, where he got busy playing music. Melrose was a big fan of Jelly Roll Morton. Morton and Frank became friends and jammed together occasionally in clubs on the South Side of Chicago. Here is one track that may have been a simple moment between them. Pass the Jug.

Frank Melrose – “Pass The Jug” mp3

E.C. Cobb & his Corn Eaters – “Transatlantic Stomp” mp3

Junius “Junie” Cobb was a highly versatile musician. He played banjo, clarinet, piano and saxophone. He moved to Chicago in the 1920’s and played with King Oliver as a banjoist for a couple of years before creating his own style with his band the Corn Eaters, which included his brother Jimmy Cobb on trumpet for “Transatlantic Stomp.”

E.C. Cobb & his Corn Eaters – “Transatlantic Stomp” mp3